Neighborhood Action Collective

Our collective power to change the world comes from the grassroots, not from the state. From coronavirus, police terrorism, ecological collapse and economic exploitation our current government structures only make these problems worse; instead, time and time again it has been grassroots efforts by communities that have pushed back with real solutions. We keep us safe. When we pull together with our friends, neighbors and fellow workers we can accomplish anything. Rather than just surviving we want a world rooted in social, economic and environmental justice values. To get there we have to build relationships, communities and institutions that reflect our values conversation by conversation, block by block, neighborhood by neighborhood.

What is a NAC?

Neighborhood Action Collective (NACs) are neighborhood based affinity groups. They are autonomous communities of people who live within a shared proximity. They are formed by friends and neighbors who come together to take direct action and build alternative community resources to free our neighborhoods from state violence and dependency on exploitative economic institutions. NACs work from the shared principles of Abolition and Decolonization, Consent Based Decision Making, Gender Freedom, Social Ecology, Solidarity Economy/Mutual Aid and Municipalism.

Neighborhood Action Council

The Vision

We envision a city where there is no need to call the cops. Instead, neighbors organize community conflict intervention and mediation services. We envision a city where there is no reason to throw your life away for a meaningless job. Instead, we liberate each other from pointless work by building a solidarity economy and pushing back against bosses. We grow our own food, develop our own community health clinics, and build our own housing. We envision a city where there is no fear of ICE raids, or racist and gendered street violence, because we have organized our own alternative neighborhood watches to keep us safe, and where there is no need for a mayor or city council to make decisions on our behalf. Instead, we will build a wealth of neighborhood-based directly democratic assemblies; places where all neighbors come to have equal say over the decisions which affect their lives. In this city, there is no possibility of displacement or gentrification because the land has been decommodified. Housing is recognized as a human right, and it is the people who live in a neighborhood who control their collective destiny rather than outside business owners and city bureaucrats.

How to Form a NAC

To realize this vision we see the need for the formation of a city wide dual-power by organizing NACs in neighborhoods across the city. NACs act as the kindling for neighborhood self-organization and self-governance. They can start small and focus on one or two actions or projects at first. NACs can then join with other's in their area of neighborhood to form Neighborhood Communes that can meet multiple needs in the community. From there Neighborhood Communes can choose to work together to form Neighborhood Coalitions.

Step 1

Find 2-4 friends who live close by.

Step 2

Get folks together for an initial conversation, make some ground rules and discuss how you want to work together.

Step 3

Take action!

Join Others Forming NACs in Their Neighborhoods

NACs are added to the map on a voluntary basis. Dependent upon what type of activities your NAC is taking up you may or may not choose to list it.

If you would like to start a NAC in your area shoot us an email or sign-up to join Symbiosis PDX.

Neighborhood Organizing

Neighborhood organizing is about shifting the focus from appealing to those in power for change, to building the new world in the shell of the old for ourselves. It’s an approach embodied by the slogan “all power to the people!”.  It’s about redeveloping our communal social fabric. In a world where humane society has been destroyed and replaced with a materialistic, individualistic consumer culture, where people are treated as disposable and we aim to build roots and fight where we stand. Social change is a slow process  and without it revolution will only ever be a changing of the guard of the same old oppressive system.

Through focusing our organizing efforts in the areas where we live and work, places where we spend most of our days, we can begin to revolutionize our everyday lives. Through building relationships with our neighbors, community members and fellow workers and communicating our values through our actions and deeds we can expose the possibility of a new world beyond a dependence on capitalism and the state. Mutual-aid programs, based in our neighborhoods can begin feeding our neighbors, neighborhood assemblies can begin to give neighbors a voice and a place to start making changes in the world around them. The relationships we build can form the base of restorative justice programs to make the police obsolete. Together we can take direct account to defend our community from those who wish to commit violence against us.

Neighborhood Organizing starts with communicating with our neighbors, through conversation, art, direct-action, bloc parties, and more. It is about building long term roots in a community. It's about sticking it out and fighting together.

Resources and Guides

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

This guide aims to empower people to become effective organizers in their communities. Organizers bring people together and make it easier for people to take action and succeed. Organizers help people see how they can work together and make an impact. This happens at a group level (convening, facilitating, etc) and by supporting individuals to take on responsibilities and be more comfortable taking action for what they believe in. This guide provides information about some of the basics of organizing: the fundamental principles and the specifics of the most common skills.

Facilitation Guide

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

We’ve all been in meetings where people are talking over each other, discussion jumps from topic to topic and back without resolution, everyone is confused, tensions are high, nothing is decided, you end way over time, and everyone leaves frustrated. But meetings don’t have to be this way. Effective facilitation can make meetings more pleasant, organized, clear, supportive, inclusive, and egalitarian. This guide is meant to help more people feel empowered to facilitate (both inside and outside of NAC) so that roles can be more equally distributed and meetings can run smoothly in every organization.

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

Starting a new group can be intimidating. But it is often the best thing to do if there are no groups that resonate with you nearby. It is a significant amount of work, but very rewarding.

It is a huge help if you can work with a few people on these steps. . But this guide also works for an individual starting a group on their own.

Security Culture Guide

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

A security culture is a set of customs shared by a community whose members may be targeted by the government, designed to minimize risk. The bare truth is that we live in a surveillance state that is unparalleled. Many people are legitimately worried or afraid of state repression. This fear can become paranoia and paralysis. As a result, some will not get involved in radical activism. Others will stay involved, but their paranoia will create a stifling atmosphere and drive people away. The result? Our movements die.

Security Culture – a simple set of rules anyone can follow – reduces paranoia and fear, and makes us safer so that we can do our work effectively. This page is a basic introduction to security culture and should not be considered comprehensive. Be smart and adapt to your specific situation.

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

Disclaimer: In cases of bullying, abuse, or attempts to dominate/control mediation is not helpful and is not advised. This guide is for people that seek to have equal power and are having some kind of misunderstanding or hurt feelings that they would both truly like to resolve.

We want to do conflict well, for tensions between people to be healthy and contribute to personal and collective growth. This is a guide for people helping to mediate or supporting a conflict resolution conversation. This guide assumes the people involved have already agreed to talk with your support.

Role of a mediator is to start off the conversation right, intervene as needed, and insure that everything has been resolved at the end. Otherwise step back and create a supportive space for the people to talk.

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Points of Unity

Points of unity are important because it reaffirms the social, ecological and economic justice  values that we in commonhold. Our principles guide the actions, projects and programs we embark on together. Our shared points of unity ensures that all of our efforts are working together towards common goals of systemic social change.

Our points of unity are as follows.

Abolition and Decolonization

The city of Portland sits on the traditional lands of many tribal groups who made homes on the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia Rivers, including Multnomah, Wasco, Cowlitz, Kathlamet, Clackamas, Bands of Chinook, Tualatin, Kalapuya, and Molalla. We seek to work directly in solidarity with indigenous peoples for sovereignty, autonomy and equitable land redistribution. Additionally, we must work to dismantle the oppressive punitive prison industrial complex, the carceral mentality and white supremacy at large.

Consent Based Decision Making

Everyone deserves to have their voice heard and leverage over decisions that impact them. Together we can co-create a society where everyone has an opportunity to shape the world around them where we reclaim control over our collective destiny from the destructive course set by those in power.

Gender Freedom

Patriarchal violence is the root of oppressive social structures. We oppose the patriarchy in all forms and collectively work to disengage from this form of acculturation towards a full and free expression of gender in all its diversity.

Social Ecology

We recognize that our ecological problems are rooted in our social problems. As such we must become stewards of the land and see ourselves as interdependent with the natural world.

Solidarity Economy & Mutual Aid

Through building grassroots economic institutions we can grow our own food, build our own housing and develop ways of communal physical, mental and emotional care beyond the isolated individualistic drudgery of our current capitalist economic system.

Municipalism 

The political and economic self-determination of our communities and the autonomy of our municipalities is essential. By developing new forms of popular civic engagement on a local level, such as neighborhood assemblies and councils, we can begin shifting power over municipal governments from serving the interests of a powerful few to full community control.

How NAC's Can Work Together and Scale Up: Neighborhood Communes and Coalitions

NACs are autonomous neighborhood affinity groups of a few dozen people at most. NACs are flexible, it is up to those involved to decide on the scope of their activity and the area they will cover with their actions. There are no set boundaries. The level of formality of your NAC and the actions you will take on is up to you. We envision in the future a wide diversity of NACs in neighborhoods across occupied Portland, each taking on unique and important roles to meet the organizing needs of their communities; however, to build our community power we have to scale up.

As is the nature of the NAC itself NACs can work together on a decentralized model based on neighborhood affinity. At least three NACs who choose to come together can form a “neighborhood commune”. A neighborhood commune is a collection of NACs who exist to fill a diversity of organizing needs for community members within a self-selected geographic area. It is recommended that each neighborhood commune should work to hold regular neighborhood assemblies which can inform their collective work. If there exists at least two Neighborhood Communes they can then choose to join together through forming a Neighborhood Coalition. To facilitate the interworking of Neighborhood Communes and Coalitions we recommend utilizing sociocratic facilitation and organizational processes.

To transform society we must also move beyond our local context. Symbiosis PDX is an international federation of organizations working towards revolutionary municipalism. By forming a NAC you have an opportunity to apply to join Symbiosis in this effort if you choose.

ScalingUp

Choose an Action

Take Direct Action

DirectAction

Direct action gets the goods. There are so many different ways that you can choose to take action in your neighborhood. From organizing a demonstration or march, putting together a reclaim the streets party or even more stealthy endeavors against your target of choice. Choosing a direct action is a great place to start with your NAC. Check out all of our great resources filled with ideas and tips on how you can start  to make a change in your neighborhoods.

Resources and Guides

Get in Formation is a collection of security and safety practices built by years of learning in the streets from Black, Indigenous, and People of Color movements within the U.S.

Get in Formation is a collection of security and safety practices built by years of learning in the streets from Black, Indigenous, and People of Color movements within the U.S.

This book is about cooking up a movement, and understanding the terminology and landscape of what's out there, including topics like coalition building, affinity groups, mental health, sabotage, squatting, wheat-pasting, and more. It's illustrated. It's annotated. It's got first person stories and technical recipes and diagrams.

This book is about cooking up a movement, and understanding the terminology and landscape of what's out there, including topics like coalition building, affinity groups, mental health, sabotage, squatting, wheat-pasting, and more. It's illustrated. It's annotated. It's got first person stories and technical recipes and diagrams.

A basic introduction to participating in a large-scale direct action protest (although the tips would likely be helpful for smaller scale actions too). Covers affinity groups, staying safe on the streets (crowd dynamics, police, using the buddy system, etc.), basic medical information, chemical weapons (their use/effects and how to mitigate those effects), and jail and court solidarity. If you are going to read just one zine on direct action, this is arguably one of the most important.

A basic introduction to participating in a large-scale direct action protest (although the tips would likely be helpful for smaller scale actions too). Covers affinity groups, staying safe on the streets (crowd dynamics, police, using the buddy system, etc.), basic medical information, chemical weapons (their use/effects and how to mitigate those effects), and jail and court solidarity. If you are going to read just one zine on direct action, this is arguably one of the most important.

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Build Alternatives to Police

AlternativesToPolice

The rise of mass incarceration, the systemic federal de-funding of mental health services and low-income housing since the 1980's and the historic role of the police as the enforcers of a violent white supremacist capitalist system have created a society rittled with massive social inequality that is unable to take care of its own people. Meanwhile the state's bureaucratic legal system assumes the role as the primary mediator of conflict between oppressed peoples in society. Parallel to the systemic defunding of social services we have  seen a ballooning of police budgets. As they have become more militarized they have been expected to take on the role of warrior social worker for the capitalist class.

Yet because of this lack of alternatives everyday hundreds of  people in the city call the police in response to community members in mental health crisis, conflicts between neighbors, and experiences of all kinds. Often this leads to regrettable outcomes for those who have made the call.

It's time to build alternatives to the police and prison industrial complex. To do this we must build community based conflict resolution and direct violence intervention programs. For thousands of years communities navigated their internal conflicts themselves. We can do it again. Resources listed here such as the Creative Interventions ToolKit provide extensively researched practices designed for community members with no formal training to begin practicing just that.

Lets make the police irrelevant. It starts with us.

 

Resources and Guides

The Toolkit contains a basic model for violence intervention, useful information, worksheets, and stories based upon the experiences of Creative Interventions during its development and pilot stages.

The Toolkit contains a basic model for violence intervention, useful information, worksheets, and stories based upon the experiences of Creative Interventions during its development and pilot stages.

This zine is a compilation of case-studies on alternatives to cops. The booklet focuses on projects that don’t collaborate with the state or court system in any way. A long bibliography for further reading is also included

This zine is a compilation of case-studies on alternatives to cops. The booklet focuses on projects that don’t collaborate with the state or court system in any way. A long bibliography for further reading is also included

This guide—it’s really more of a “packet” than a zine—provides an overview of how to start a “copwatch” group. For those who are unfamiliar, copwatch groups seek to end police repression by monitoring and recording police interactions with people on the street and informing people of their legal rights. The guide explains how to do on-the-street observations, offers tips for recording the police, legal advice, and explains how police departments are structured.

This guide—it’s really more of a “packet” than a zine—provides an overview of how to start a “copwatch” group. For those who are unfamiliar, copwatch groups seek to end police repression by monitoring and recording police interactions with people on the street and informing people of their legal rights. The guide explains how to do on-the-street observations, offers tips for recording the police, legal advice, and explains how police departments are structured.

This guide is published by the excellent website AworldWithoutPolice.org which has as its goal the complete abolition of the police. To that end, this pamphlet provides an excellent introduction to the problem of the police (exploring their history and reasons for existing), as well as offering many specific suggestions for moving towards a world without police. The discussion centers a strategy of disempowering, disarming, and disbanding the police with practical ideas of what that could look like and what it would take to get there. Overall, this is an excellent pamphlet that would be great for getting in the hands of folks who aren’t already familiar with critiques of police and policing.

This guide is published by the excellent website AworldWithoutPolice.org which has as its goal the complete abolition of the police. To that end, this pamphlet provides an excellent introduction to the problem of the police (exploring their history and reasons for existing), as well as offering many specific suggestions for moving towards a world without police. The discussion centers a strategy of disempowering, disarming, and disbanding the police with practical ideas of what that could look like and what it would take to get there. Overall, this is an excellent pamphlet that would be great for getting in the hands of folks who aren’t already familiar with critiques of police and policing.

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Advance Community Defense

CommunityDefense

Community Defense is about building long-term community projects that focus on defending a community from violence. The self-defense of any community is an essential element in protecting their identity, dignity and self-determination. Today the state maintains a "monopoly on violence" that it shares with its fascist goons and lone-wolves it consistently lets off the hook for murdering and killing oppressed peoples.

In this atmosphere we cannot rely on the state, the police or the military to keep us safe. It's up to us to watch each-others backs, patrol our own streets and build the self-defense skills individuals in our communities need. Here we present a few different resources on how to build community defense projects in your area.

Resources and Guides

When many reform activists continue to appeal to oppressive institutions to solve the problems of repression and oppression, the manual charts a different path where matters are taken into the hands of the people, both in response to specific attacks they face from government and reactionary aggression, but also in building the struggle to end those oppressive powers once and for all. Well worthy of study and broad distribution and active organizing

When many reform activists continue to appeal to oppressive institutions to solve the problems of repression and oppression, the manual charts a different path where matters are taken into the hands of the people, both in response to specific attacks they face from government and reactionary aggression, but also in building the struggle to end those oppressive powers once and for all. Well worthy of study and broad distribution and active organizing

Anti-Racist Neighborhood Watch Quick Start Manual is an initiative to generalize and broaden anti-racist work in our communities in Portland and across the country. It is the hope that this packet can be used as an entrance-way to start addressing these issues by new comers to the movement and veterans alike. It is a suggested model on how to get organized in your communities with some tangible tools to get started right away.

Imagine ARNW chapters in neighborhoods, cities and towns across the country, getting each others backs and taking a proactive stand against bigoted activity at every level. In order to stop the rise of the extreme right we must come together as neighbors as never before. As opposed to relying on empty rhetoric of politicians looking to win political points, building real community and neighborhood power is essential in creating actual sanctuary cities were targeted communities are safe and can seek refuge from both state sponsored and grassroots right-wing violence.

Anti-Racist Neighborhood Watch Quick Start Manual is an initiative to generalize and broaden anti-racist work in our communities in Portland and across the country. It is the hope that this packet can be used as an entrance-way to start addressing these issues by new comers to the movement and veterans alike. It is a suggested model on how to get organized in your communities with some tangible tools to get started right away.

Imagine ARNW chapters in neighborhoods, cities and towns across the country, getting each others backs and taking a proactive stand against bigoted activity at every level. In order to stop the rise of the extreme right we must come together as neighbors as never before. As opposed to relying on empty rhetoric of politicians looking to win political points, building real community and neighborhood power is essential in creating actual sanctuary cities were targeted communities are safe and can seek refuge from both state sponsored and grassroots right-wing violence.

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Form an Assembly

PopularAssembly

At their core assemblies are a form of gathering or meeting where people in a shared community come together to discuss the issues that have a common impact on all. In the assemblies people discuss solutions to problems  and decide on a course of action. They are inclusive gatherings of neighbors and community members open to all who share common social, economic and environmental justice values. Think of them as alternative anti-racist and directly democratic version of a neighborhood association. It is a place to build a broad base of neighborhood dual-power to make structural and systemic change in our community.

Neighborhoods are not neutral de-politicized places. Today conservative's dominate many of Portland's grassroots civic institutions.  PTAs and Neighborhood Associations have real power. In many parts of the city they are vital places of grassroots support for racist and classist policies. To collaborate with "community policing" strategies that target communities of color and the houseless many neighborhood associations dominated by middle class white people openly invite police into their meetings. Neighborhood Associations also have the power to review all development plans in their areas and so they can become bases of grassroots support for gentrifying development practices and businesses that result in displacement of low-income residents. PTAs can also become influential places where advocacy for conservative educational curriculum or the funding of school "resource officers". In these spaces  dominated by white supremacist and upper middle class voices marginalized peoples and any expression of social, economic or racial justice views are often vehemently attacked and isolated.

Assemblies present a solution to this problem as an alternative form of social organization that can help us build grassroots political power for oppressed communities to push back against conservative domination in these institutions and to begin building alternative structures of support and connection beyond them. Community assemblies could organize their own community gardens, support for striking workers at a local business, host their own educational events or more. The options are endless.  Building a neighborhood assembly is be a big step towards towards the long-term empowerment and autonomy of our communities from the state and capitalism.

 

 

Resources and Guides

This Organizing Handbook is designed for organizers, educators, activists, and community members who want to use the Peoples Movement Assembly methodology to build power in their community, on their frontline struggle, and in our social movements.

This Organizing Handbook is designed for organizers, educators, activists, and community members who want to use the Peoples Movement Assembly methodology to build power in their community, on their frontline struggle, and in our social movements.

Social Movements throughout history and around the world have used assemblies to make decisions. Movements, particularly in the Global South – Africa, Asia, and Latin America have used assemblies to advance the practice of people power, self-determination, and governance.

Communalism is the means and ends of directly democratic, non hierarchical, ecological, co-federated community assemblies that seek to meet people’s needs, decentralize power, oppose hierarchies, create reconstructive and oppositional collectives, and to build the new world within the shell of the old via libertarian socialist dual power. It is a praxis–an intertwined theory and a practice– that applies universalist principles to particular contexts adapting to relevant conditions and variables accordingly. Communalist assemblies seek to intertwine reconstructive politics, oppositional politics, collective building, principled action, and consequential efficacy.

Communalism is the means and ends of directly democratic, non hierarchical, ecological, co-federated community assemblies that seek to meet people’s needs, decentralize power, oppose hierarchies, create reconstructive and oppositional collectives, and to build the new world within the shell of the old via libertarian socialist dual power. It is a praxis–an intertwined theory and a practice– that applies universalist principles to particular contexts adapting to relevant conditions and variables accordingly. Communalist assemblies seek to intertwine reconstructive politics, oppositional politics, collective building, principled action, and consequential efficacy.

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Construct a Solidarity Economy

SolidarityEconomy

A solidarity economy is the idea that we can organize to take care of our own needs permanently. Imagine a network of cooperatives, community supported agriculture projects and mutual-aid initiatives all working together to each provide for a different need in the community. From growing our own food, cooking and preparing meals to distribute to the community, sharing our tools and manufacturing our own essential items such as PPE or clothes we can reduce our reliance on the destructive capitalist system.

Your NAC could begin anywhere from starting a community garden to distributing food to the houseless. By plugging into a solidarity economy network our efforts can build off each-other as we build a wide web of community support.

Resources and Guides

This zine is a quick compilation of the following resources accessible online to support mutual aid-based projects providing services for their communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic:

Safety Practices for COVID-19/Coronavirus Mutual Aid Projects – http://bit.ly/mutualaidCOVIDsafetypractices
QueerCare Resources for Support Care In and In Response to the COVID019 Global Pandemic – http://bit.ly/QueerCareResources
Food Handling During Outbreak – http://bit.ly/mutualaidCOVIDfoodhandling

Note this zine is NOT meant for those providing direct care for individuals with Coronavirus. Distribute to those who are undertaking the challenging and scary work of navigating this crisis while getting communities the resources they need to survive. To make edits or suggestions, contact [email protected]

This zine is a quick compilation of the following resources accessible online to support mutual aid-based projects providing services for their communities amid the COVID-19 pandemic:

Safety Practices for COVID-19/Coronavirus Mutual Aid Projects – http://bit.ly/mutualaidCOVIDsafetypractices
QueerCare Resources for Support Care In and In Response to the COVID019 Global Pandemic – http://bit.ly/QueerCareResources
Food Handling During Outbreak – http://bit.ly/mutualaidCOVIDfoodhandling

Note this zine is NOT meant for those providing direct care for individuals with Coronavirus. Distribute to those who are undertaking the challenging and scary work of navigating this crisis while getting communities the resources they need to survive. To make edits or suggestions, contact [email protected]

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Promote Popular Education

We have to push back against the mainstream narrative that wished to discredit  our movement. Instead of focusing and debating the tactics of protestors we want to make sure to keep the conversation centered on the systemic issues of racism, capitalism and state violence we came here to address. It's critical that we communicate and educate our communities that the surface level problems such as police brutality have their roots in the systemic issues of white supremacy, capitalism and the state. There are so many ways your NAC can communicate its message from banner drops, wheat pastes to street canvassing and talking to your neighbors.

PopularEducation

Resources and Guides

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

This zine compiles four “how to” guides written by ACTIVATE out of Grand Rapids, MI. The guides provide basic information on how to do banner drops, stencils, wheatpasting, and distributing information.

Includes tips on how to make and secure banners, how to design and deploy stencils, how to make wheatpaste, and offers some ideas for distributing radical info and propaganda.

previous arrownext arrow
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